Sep 032014
 

market-basket  I just visited my local Market Basket for the first time since the now infamous pissing match between the billionaire owners ended.  Can’t say I’m happy about it.

I don’t do a lot of grocery shopping since I don’t cook and mainly eat fast food.  But I do buy three things from Market Basket on a nearly weekly basis: cigarettes, beverages and snack foods.  While I’m amazed by the outpouring of support for Arthur T. Demoulas that the world was recently witness to and was excited to see so many people band together to stand up for what they believed was right, I continued to shop at Market Basket during the whole debacle.  Why?  Because I’m not interested in going to additional expense or trouble to support a billionaire spoiled brat.  But that’s not what this post is about.

This post is about the punishment and deceit that I (and so many others) saw coming.

On Saturday, the Boston Herald ran a story titled: CEO not in Market to raise prices. Here are the first few paragraphs- Continue reading »

Jan 082014
 

USConstitution It amazes me how often I hear people calling themselves Liberty activists referring to some action by the government being “Constitutional” or “Unconstitutional” as if this has some relevance to freedom.  The United States Constitution has nothing to do with a free society.  It is merely a set of rules that the government is required to follow.  And even at that it is an incredibly flawed document.

So many people seem to believe that the Constitution “grants”, “protects”, or “defends” our rights when a simple reading of the Constitution itself shows that it doesn’t aspire to any such lofty goals, with a single exception.  The only time the word “right” appears in the Constitution is in Article I, Section 8 in regards to intellectual property: “To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries;“.

Of course, I have no doubt your immediate response to my last paragraph is to point to the Bill of Rights.  But no rights are granted there either.  Continue reading »

Nov 162013
 

I stumbled across a column in the November 14th issue of The Hooksett Banner by Amber Cushing, Director of the Allenstown Public Library.  The column does not seem to have been posted to the newspaper’s website, so I’m going to post it in its entirety before giving y’all my thoughts-

As I alluded to in the last piece in my column, I’d like to address the argument that “I don’t use the library, so it doesn’t need funding.”

Again, statistics alone disprove this argument.  At the Allenstown Public Library, 34 percent of the population has a library card, and circulation has increased every year for the past five years.  But as with my last column, I’d like to explre the roots of this claim.

When someone claims, “No one uses the library anymore, so we don’t need a library,” they most likely mean “I don’t use the library anymore, so it has no value for anyone else.”  This argument is akin to saying, “I don’t drive on Main Street, so it does not need to be paved.”  Just because one person chooses not to use a town service does not mean the town service ceases to have value for someone else.  A more accurate statement would be “I choose not to use some town services, so they have no value to me.”  OK.  Great.  You’re entitled to your choice.  However, when it comes to the library at least 34 percent of town residents do not agree with you.  And that’s OK, too, because they are entitled to their choices.

We get ourselves into a sticky situation when we assume that everyone should make the same choices we make.  The world doesn’t work that way.  Things get even stickier when we assume that everyone has the same financial means we do.  “I can afford to buy my own computer(s), books, DVDs, Internet access, etc., so no one else needs access to these things,” or “I don’t like to read, so no one else should be able to read,” don’t make for very effective arguments, either.

So when you think about your opinion regarding the necessity of the library, I challenge you to ask yourself: Am I trying to force my choices onto someone else?  Why?

There are a lot of problems with Ms. Cushing’s arguments, but I’m just going to address the most glaring. Continue reading »

Oct 192013
 

I just returned from a three-day trip that was originally supposed to be a one day trip.  One result: my chinchillas were very hungry.

So, one of the first things I did upon returning home was to go feed them.  As usual, upon opening the top door to their cage Mario ran for cover (hiding near the bottom) and Luigi, who had approached the door upon hearing me enter the room, instinctively froze so as not to attract predators.  I gave Luigi a little pet, announced that dinner was served, and placed the food in the center of their “hidden” (read: safe) room and began to close the door.

As the door was swinging shut, Luigi started heading for the food and I realized I’d forgotten to check their water so reopened the door at which point Luigi stepped back away from the food and once again froze next to the opening.

How ridiculous is that?  He was clearly hungry, and clearly not afraid of me, but despite the presence of food he went back into “don’t let the predators see you moving mode”.

Jun 242011
 
Part of the Ask An Anarchist Series - Previous in series         Next in series

Zen

Isn’t this really one of the biggest questions that each and every one of us has encountered at some point?  And, of course, it may not seem to have anything to do with anarchy, philosophy, government, business, or anything else covered on this website.    But, on reflection, I thin kit may have to do with everything ever discussed on this site.  But, most of all with parenting, which was, of course, the original inspiration for me to start blogging.

The attitude of not being a winner is the way people get into trouble in life.  The fact you woke up this morning makes you a winner, and no one make you a loser but yourself.

Each day look at the wins you have.  Value the greatness in your life, little and big.  If you find it impossible to isolate any wins in your life, use affirmations and begin creating some.

You can start now to change your own reality.  You are a loser, only when you think you are.

  • Thomas Edison declared bankruptcy for the North American Phonograph Co. in 1894, and his Edison Portland Cement Company filed for bankruptcy twice.
  • Abraham Lincoln, Henry Ford, Walt Disney, Milton hershey, H.J. Heinz, and P.T. Barnum all went bankrupt at least once as well.
  • Before filing for bankruptcy, Walt Disney was fired by the Kansas City Star newspaper for lacking ideas.
  • Colonel Sanders idea for Kentucky Fried Chicken was reportedly rejected more than 1000 times
Enhanced by Zemanta
Part of the Ask An Anarchist Series - Previous in series        Next in series