May 172008
 

Mpfree_new_logoI honestly didn’t expect to be writing any more articles on general GPT or “Paid For Action” sites. I decided some time ago that signing up for offers I only intended to cancel simply wasn’t worth my time or sanity. But when I heard you could Get Free Music From MPFree.com I headed over to see what all the fuss was about.

It turns out they’ve got a new twist on an old game. If you’re familiar with GPT sites, then all you need to know is that instead of earning cash, at MPFree you’ll earn songs in MP3 format that you can download, 100% legally from their servers. If you’re not familiar with GPT programs than read on….

GPT programs sprung up as a result of affiliate marketing on the internet. Affiliate marketing is essentially big companies (and some small ones) paying individual webmasters and bloggers a set fee for every person they get to fill out a form, sign up for a newsletter, complete a survey, or request more product info. The webmasters of GPT programs gather hundreds or thousands of people together to use their affiliate links for these programs and thus earn a higher commission. They then pass on some of their earnings to you for every action you performed. In this case, instead of them passing along cash, they’re converting that cash to legal MP3s.

Pretty ingenious, actually.

May 132008
 

I’m not sure why the idea struck my mind earlier today, but I am once again considering starting my own Paid To Read (PTR)/Paid To Click (PTC) website. I already own a domain name that could work for it (and is currently underutilized) and I’ve got free webhosting thanks to Top Hosting Center, so I figured why not. Well, that’s what I’m here to ask all of you: Why Not?

With the domain and hosting already covered my only real expenses will be advertising (which will primarily be handled by the members looking to increase their referral downlines) and the PTR scripts themselves. Cash Crusader seems to be the most stable of the PTR scripts so I’d be going with them. Cash Crusader costs only $75 and I could see myself spending about another $100 on various plugins. All of these software licenses are for the life of the site so they’re one-time startup costs.

Other than the scripts and some minimal advertising my only other recurring costs would be member payouts and the time involved in operating the program itself. The payouts shouldn’t be a problem at all as long as I set reasonable rates for incoming ads. Again, since I have almost no recurring costs this should not be too difficult. It’s the time involved that is my real concern.

I’ve tried to locate a forum for Cash Crusader admins but have been unsuccessful thus far. I used to know of several when I got started in GPT about a decade ago, but had no luck earlier today. Again, that’s why I’m turning to you, dear readers. Does anyone have any experience running GPT programs? Comments or emails would be very much appreciated!

Dec 102007
 

If you’ve been in the Get Paid To world for more than a few months your answer should certainly be: probably. As my regular readers know I’m not much of a fan of Get Paid To Sign Up sites for a number of reasons. My primary reason is that I understand the other side of the GPT equation. However, I know many of you are devotees of the GPT world, so I’m still happy to bring you the latest news and safety measures in the GPT industry.

The latest tip comes, once again, from MrGPT

I’m always looking to find reputable GPT sites that pay their members, and a few weeks ago I found a simple “trick” that I call the Shiftcode trick to see how much money a site has paid out, if any. I call it the Shiftcode trick because it only works on Shiftcode.

[…]

So, what’s the trick? The trick is actually pretty simple. All you do is add “/members/withdraw/list.php” to the end of the URL. Let’s take www.cashninjas.com for example. If you simply add “/members/withdraw/list.php” to the end of that link (which gives you www.cashninjas.com/members/withdraw/list.php), you will notice that it will bring you up to a page that lists all the members that have been approved for their cashout at the site. If you add up all the withdrawals, you will see that CashNinjas does not fake their stats.

This is just a simple little trick that can be used. If you see a site claims to have paid $3,000, but then you go to their withdraw list and see they’ve only paid out $500, you know their lying. I would advise you to stay away from sites like these.

Nov 122007
 

I joined DonkeyMails on July 16th because evryone in the PTR community seemed to be absolutely in love with them and their PTP program. I then spent a couple of bucks over the next few moths promoting their PTP pages in an attempt to actually earn a little cash. What a huge mistake!

Not only did it take me more than three months to earn enough PTP credits to convert them into actual money, but in that same amount of time I still wasn’t close to the $1.00 minimum payout as a result of clicking through their PTR ads and my referral earnings from six referrals. I had 2 level 1 refs, and 1 each on the following four levels. Yet, I still earned only around 2% of my personal earnings via referrals. If my refs had all generated the same revenue I had that number should have been 20%!

When I finally was able to convert my PTP “earnings” (in quotes because I actually spent more then I earned) and was finally able to request payout it took more than 2 weeks to actually receive the payout. This despite their front page assertion of “Payouts will be made weekly!”, their slogan of “automatic no minimum payouts”, and their TOS assuring that “Payments will be made within 10 days or a reasonable time after.”

DonkeyMails may be the biggest PTR in business today, but they’re far from the best. For those keeping score at home, here are the PTR programs I still use and recommend (in order of my recommendation):

  1. Fishing4Mails
  2. TesasTeaMails
  3. Myster-E-Mail
  4. NocturnalEmail
  5. ValePTR
  6. Twisted-Clickers
Nov 102007
 

Thanks to a little link love I found my way to the NatBooty blog today. She’s got a pretty solid blog developing on Get Paid To programs, though she’s apparently had some technical problems of late. But it’s her GPT Calendar that I want to share with you. This is the kind of innovation I was looking for while running the GPT/PTR/PTC Carnival, but I just couldn’t find it on a regular basis.

Essentially, she’s leveraged the power of Google Calendars to not only track the upcoming promotions and specials at various GPT programs, but she’s sharing that calendar with anyone interested in the information. A couple of quick clicks allows you to look at the current day, week, month, next four days, or as a listing of all upcoming events. As of today she has a dozen different promotions listed at a half dozen different GPT companies. But this girls obviously got gumption, so I expect this to become a standard stop for the bulk of the GPT world in the near future.